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  • Wilder vs Fury 2: Teofimo Lopez outlines winning strategy for the Bronze Bomber

Wilder vs Fury 2: Teofimo Lopez outlines winning strategy for the Bronze Bomber

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Joseph Herron Updated
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In just over a month's time, Deontay Wilder will attempt to finally earn a decisive victory over his Heavyweight nemesis, Tyson Fury. The fight is slated to take place on February 22nd, at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Although most of Wilder's fans and critics consistently rave about his incredible punching power, IBF Lightweight champion Teofimo Lopez offers a very insightful breakdown of what Deontay must do in order to find greater success against the always elusive Tyson Fury.

The gifted young fighter insists that Wilder's intelligence will be his primary key to victory on fight night.

"Deontay Wilder is a strong fighter, but we've all seen the flaws that he had in the first fight," Teofimo explained during an interview with FightHub TV. "Deontay has a beautiful one-two...strongest one-two in the game, literally. But if he can't hit you, it doesn't matter."

During the first meeting between Wilder and Fury, which took place on December 1st, 2018, Deontay would often throw hard but wide, looping shots exclusively to the head of his evasive and slippery opponent. The 22-year-old phenom from Brooklyn claims the current WBC heavyweight champion cannot wait on his opponent during the return bout.

Lopez states that it is imperative for Deontay to get off first and not allow Tyson to dictate the pace of the fight, while throwing a greater variety of punches to the body and head of Fury's massive 6'9" frame.

"Wilder has to commit more. Wilder can't think so much, and he can't be so stiff when he's throwing his punches. But that's how Wilder is when he throws his one-two's. He needs to be more relaxed and not throw the same looping shots over and over. If you throw the same shots at Tyson Fury, he'll figure out your timing and rhythm and make you miss. That's what Tyson Fury was doing in the first fight...over and over."

Because Tyson is almost always the taller and rangier fighter in the ring, he's very proficient at using his footwork and jab as the foundation of his defensive, consistently moving in and out of range while firing shots to the body and head. And because Tyson implements a lot of feints and upper body/head movement, it becomes a futile practice to sit and wait on Fury. It's impossible to time and counter a fighter who proficiently uses disjunct movement in the pocket like Tyson Fury.

Wilder would be wise to commit to his offense without any trepidation...even if he initially misses his intended mark. Lopez insists that a consistent attack to the body would be a great place to start.

"Tyson Fury is really good at controlling range. Wilder has to mix up his punches better and go to the body more frequently. The only way you close that distance is to go the body first and work your way up. They're both tall. So you can go for the body. It's much harder when fighting a smaller fighter, but they're both tall."

"That's what he has to change. He has to touch the body more and use his jab. Wilder has a strong, fast jab. Instead of throwing straight loops to the head all of the time, mix it up...go to the body. Tyson is always moving his head, but that body is still there and you can touch it. Don't come out headhunting."

The talented Lightweight titleholder also points out that a mixture of jabs would be beneficial in keeping his surprisingly nimble opponent off balance.

"Also, mix up the jab. Don't just use the same velocity when throwing that jab. Mix it up with some feints and touch jabs...he has to do something to throw off Fury's timing and rhythm. And if he doesn't land right away, don't abandon the jab...it sets up everything else."

Despite highlighting a solid fight plan for Deontay Wilder in the highly anticipated rematch, Teofimo Lopez heavily favors the Gypsy King to decisively beat the reigning WBC champ on February 22nd.

"Tyson Fury all day," states the intelligent Lightweight champion. "I'd bet my house on it. I don't even have a house yet, and I'd bet it!"

Who will emerge victorious on February 22nd at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada?

 
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