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Sunday, 21 September 2014 21:48

Floyd Mayweather: Alleged sparring abuses and marijuana abetting probed by NAC

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He just can't stay away from controversy.

One week after defeating Marcos Maidana in their rematch, the Nevada Athletic Commission may launch an investigation into alleged sparring abuses and marijuana use in the fight icon's mansion.

The probe stems from segments shown on Showtime's All Access prior to last week's fight.

Scenes seemingly show two sparring partners at Mayweather's gym fighting for long periods with no break.

Mayweather, himself, stated on All Access, the fighters are supposed to keep sparring until someone quits.


"We all know TV is drama but our main responsibility in the health and safety of fighters ... I want to ensure that what they're doing is in the best interest of fighters," said Francisco Aguilar, head of the commission, quoted by The Sydney Morning Herald.

Wisely, Aguilar admitted he may not have all of the facts, insisting, "Before we draw a conclusion about what we saw on TV we want to make sure we have all the information." 

Fact: It's not uncommon for professional boxers to spar well over three minutes, the length of a round in a pro fight, during training. As long as the trainer - or an experienced sidekick or apprentice - is present to ensure a fighter isn't taking unnecessary punishment, one can greatly enhance his/her stamina by sparing beyond the minimum of three minutes.

Actually, a trainer (or someone in that capacity) should always be present, regardless the level or intensity of sparring. Either way, having fighters spar for a purported 31 minutes without a break and until someone relents seems a bit extreme.

Sparring is not fighting. Combatants should never be forced to make their opponents quit unless they are engaged in a sanctioned prizefight.

Perhaps this was exaggerated for ratings purposes... or maybe Floyd is too hardcore in the gym? Regardless, if the allegations are true, something must be changed.


Marijuana probe
In one episode of All Access, Floyd is mingling with women while his posse rolls joints. Although Floyd, himself, did not imbibe, he told an assistant to purchase more of what was believed to be cannabis. And while it probably cannot be proven (because it was on TV) in the court of law, purchasing weed is still a misdemeanor and is not something that should be advertised.

Disappointed by the aforementioned segments, investmests icon Warren Buffett, Floyd's new friend and alleged newest member of The Money Team (TMT), refused to walk Floyd into the ring for the latter's big fight last week. Buffett, who still hung in Floyd's dressing room and watched the bout at ringside, believed such actions reflected poorly on him.

Mayweather is scheduled to show in front of the commission on Tuesday to address its concerns over sparring practices and, perhaps, Floyd's aiding and abetting the use of pot on his premises.

Keep in mind, Floyd is not only a boxer; he's a real and legitimate fight promoter with lofty ambitions who was recently granted licenses in New York, DC and, yes, Nevada.


Will action be taken against Floyd's company, TMT, in Nevada?